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Heatherlands Primary School

Enjoying Learning Together

Safeguarding

'Together We Can' Helpline

 

As an additional layer of support, BCP Council have set up the ‘Together We Can’ initiative to support the most extremely vulnerable in our communities.

 

Some of our families, because of Covid 19, are unable to access their FSM because of isolation and illness. In order to ensure these families are not disadvantaged in any way, BCP Council have a ‘Together We Can ‘ helpline which went live on Friday 27th March 2020. If you are eligible for FSM and are struggling to provide food for your family, please contact the Helpline. Together We Can will do their best to support the family if at all possible. 

 

Together We Can Helpline Number 0300 1237052

Safeguarding Information, Policies and Procedures

Bonfire and Firework Safety

Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service is reminding everyone about the dangers of fireworks to help keep people safe this bonfire and fireworks season. With many organised events cancelled, emergency services are preparing for a busier night than usual as people celebrate in their own gardens. We are asking everyone to show RESPECT this Bonfire Night.

 

Respect the Firework

Whilst most people enjoy fireworks responsibly, in the wrong hands they can cause real misery. Remember that fireworks are explosives, and as such should be treated with respect and only used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and the Firework Code.

  • Plan your firework display to make it safe and enjoyable, and ensure it finishes before 11pm
  • Only buy fireworks which carry the CE mark, keep them in a closed box and use them one at a time
  • Read and follow the instructions on each firework using a torch if necessary
  • Light the firework at arm's length with a taper and stand well back
  • Keep naked flames, including cigarettes, away from fireworks
  • Never return to a firework once it has been lit
  • Don't put fireworks in pockets and never throw them
  • Direct any rocket fireworks well away from spectators
  • Never use paraffin or petrol on a bonfire
  • Make sure that the fire is out and surroundings are made safe before leaving.

 

Respect the Emergency Services

We are currently amidst a global pandemic and we are asking people not to take risks, putting additional pressures on our emergency services. Injuries can be prevented by following the Firework code. If you suffer a burn, ensure you:

 

  • Cool the burn under cold running water for at least ten minutes.
  • After the burn has been cooled, cover it with cling film or a clean plastic bag.
  • Call 999 if necessary. Always seek medical advice for a baby or child that has been burned.

 

Respect your neighbours

Fireworks can frighten people and animals. The elderly and children are frequently scared and intimidated by firework noise. After all, fireworks are explosives. Tell your neighbours if you’re a planning on letting off fireworks and avoid purchasing really noisy ones.  Please be considerate when having a firework party and make sure the noise is over by 11pm. 

 

You must not set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am, except for:

·         Bonfire Night, when the cut off is midnight

·         New Year’s Eve, Diwali and Chinese New Year, when the cut off is 1am

 

Show some respect this Bonfire Night.

 

Online Safety Assembly

Safer Schools and Communities Team

 

On Wednesday 15th January 2020, an officer from the Safer Schools and Community Team came into school to speak to Year 6 about online safety and friends. They were reminded that games and apps such as Call of Duty, Tik Tok and Whatsapp have a targeted age of 13 years and above.  

 

Other topics covered included: -

  • safer online profiles
  • posting information about yourself and others
  • online gaming
  • online bullying and how to deal with it
  • recognising negative aspects of spending lots of time online
  • appropriate online content
  • where to go for help with online issues

 

Children have started to think carefully about the choices they make when using technology. Explore the Thinkuknow website to find out more.

 

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/

 

NSPCC Assembly

 

On Thursday 21st November, children in KS1 and then KS2 attended an assembly lead by NSPCC. The children learnt the importance of speaking out and staying safe. They learnt some of the areas that may cause a worry such as bullying and emotional abuse as well as discussing who may be a trusted adult to them. All the children went away at the end of the day with a sticker and knowing the NSPCC number if they needed to contact someone confidentially about a worry - 0800 1111. Have a look on the website for further information.

https://www.childline.org.uk/

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/

 

Translations of the KCSIE (2019) document are available from https://www.lgfl.net/digisafe/kcsietranslate
The Safe Schools & Communities Team were in school this week to raise awareness and give advice to parents. The internet is a fantastic resource but it can also be a scary place for parents/carers who don't understand what their children are using. Please find below some links that the SSCT shared to help support parents/carers.

Safeguarding

What is abuse?

Abuse is a form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or

by failing to act to prevent harm. They may be abused by an adult or adults or another child or children.

There are four main categories of abuse: Physical, Sexual, Emotional and Neglect.

Sexual Abuse

Definition: involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, whether or

not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault

by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing,

rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children. Physical indicators: stomach pains, bruising or bleeding near the genital area, discomfort when walking or sitting down, vaginal discharge or infection, sexually transmitted disease. Behavioural indicators: sudden or unexplained changes in behaviour, apparent fear of someone, nightmares, eating problems or disorders, sexual knowledge which is beyond their age or developmental level, acting in a sexually explicit way, sexual drawings or language, substance or drug abuse, unexplained sources of money, not allowed to have friends.

Domestic Abuse

Heatherlands Primary School receives information from the Police to alert the DSL in school when there has been an incident of domestic abuse in a household where a pupil lives. We are not informed of the detail of the incident, only that one has occurred. This allows us to monitor and support the pupil. If we have additional concerns we will discuss the need for further safeguarding actions with Social Care. This information would only be shared with other staff on a restricted need to know basis i.e. those who are immediately responsible for the pupil’s welfare such as the class teacher. Where a Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC) occurs the school may be asked for information and appropriate school related information may be shared with the school after the meeting.

Abuse

A form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. They may be abused by an adult or adults or another child or children.

 

Physical abuse

A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

 

Emotional abuse

The persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone.

 

Sexual abuse

Involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

 

Neglect

The persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to: provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

 

Helplines to Stop Domestic Abuse

Safer Schools and Communities Team

Are you concerned about a child?

If you are a member of the public with significant concerns about a child please contact your local Children’s Services:

 

Telephone: 01202 735046     

E-mail: childrensfirstresponse@bcpcouncil.gov.uk  

 

 

If you are concerned that a child or young person is in an emergency situation you should contact the Police urgently on 999.

 

Outside office hours – The Out of Hours Team operates an out of hours service. The Out of Hours service is an emergency only response with the social worker available to provide a response where the needs of the child indicate this. To contact the out of hours service, please contact: -

 

Telephone: 01202 738256    

E-mail:  ChildrensOOHS@bcpcouncil.gov.uk

 

Early Help

Early Help is a way of working with children and young people. It involves listening to you and your child to find out your child’s needs, and what is working well in your child’s life. An action plan, agreed with you and your child, is also put in place to make sure your child gets the right sort of help. Early Help intervention will help your child receive the right support at an early stage before their needs increase which can be much more difficult to help you with.

 

The Early Help Assessment is voluntary – you and your child can choose to be involved.

 

How will an Early Help Assessment help my family?

  • The Early Help Assessment exists to help you support your child. It can lead to a quick solution or help to identify extra support if needed.
  • The Early Help Assessment will ensure that everyone involved with your child – such as teachers and health visitors – works together to support your child.
  • As the Early Help Assessment is a shared assessment, you and your child will not have to repeat the same story to different workers.

 

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